iPad Apps – The Louis Vuitton Accessories Of The Handheld World

Are iPad apps very expensive? This has been pointed out to me and, if it’s true, it seems to fit the image of the iPad as the Louis Vuitton of the handheld world.

The iPad has to be a luxury item. It does less than an iPhone and it's vastly less portable.

 

So the iPad's for people who don't much care about money. They buy luxury stuff, they can afford luxury stuff and they don't much mind what they pay for luxury stuff.

 

So, if I were Mr Jobs, I'd think, if my customers are like that, then give 'em what they want - high prices for the same old apps you can buy 5X cheaper for the iPhone.

 

It's the philosophy of the designer goods trade - first you identify suckers because they're the ones who buy your over-priced products - then you offer them more and more over-priced accessories.

 

It's a lovely market. The suckers come forward of their own volition asking to be skinned.

 

And we all know who the suckers are because those clever designer goods manufacturers put highly visible labels on their over-priced products.

 

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Comments

7 comments

  1. Not as zippy as it used to be, Yaw, regrettably

  2. “So, if I were Mr Jobs, I’d think, if my customers are like that, then give ’em what they want – high prices for the same old apps you can buy 5X cheaper for the iPhone.”
    That statement couldn’t more be misinformed. The app prices are not set by Apple but by developers. I figured for a respected industry blogger you’d know more; having just stumbled across your blog I’m having a hard time swallowing what seems to be a lot of uninformed opinion.
    Or, perhaps, this zippy new mobile web age is too much to keep up with.

  3. I regard myself as fairly technically literate – BSC Electronics, worked in IT (Unix & SQL) most of my career, but the iPad is without a doubt one of my best purchases ever.
    Anyone who talks about it as a large iPhone or iPod Touch really doesn’t know what they are talking about – the user experience is completely different.
    Browsing the web is far superior to using any PC, as is watching videos or telvision. Games are much better on it than on the small screen of the iPhone.
    It is the perfect computer for the living room, which I think is the key benefit. No wonder the sales of netbooks are taking a dive – http://www.itproportal.com/portal/news/article/2010/8/17/asus-eee-pc-sales-hit-ipad-launch/

  4. Nice one, Jon

  5. Some serious analogies to be gained through thinking about that… But (since it’s silly season still!?) can I take the opportunity to recycle/distort a favourite quote. Thinking of the contracts we make through our purchases: “You can’t fool me. There ain’t no Vanity Clause!”

  6. I like that, FTM – ‘Vanity or Sanity’ – a neat encapsulation of one of the dilemmas produced by human nature.

  7. “It’s a lovely market. The suckers come forward of their own volition asking to be skinned”
    Ego trips. Many people take them. Look, I can afford it – is what they are saying.
    But there is a thin line between vanity and sanity. Is buying a BMW (instead of a much cheaper car) vanity or sanity? Is buying a car (instead of using public transport) a vanity or sanity?
    Yes, buying iPad apps is different. But when you buy an iPad, you have mentally bought into the concept of iPad apps. You don’t complain that BMW accessories are more expensive than those of cheaper cars. Similarly, instead of buying an iPad you could have bought a cheaper netbook. Or not have bought one at all.
    Vanity or Sanity?

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