directivedecoder-blog-header

Expert analysis of electronics-related legislation and compliance requirements, such as RoHS, REACH and WEEE, from industry expert Gary Nevison of Farnell.

New China RoHS proposals

The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) of China has published the latest proposals, which are open to consultation until 10 July, on China RoHS.

The proposals include further clarification on the definition of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) and are along the lines of RoHS in the European Union.

The definition of hazardous substances is clarified so, for example “lead” to “lead and its compounds”

The product scope moves from Electronic Information Products (EIPs) to EEE similar to the EU and, as a result, many home appliances and electronic toys that fell out of scope of EIPs will be regulated under the new proposals.

The new proposals require that manufacturers and importers of electrical and electronic products provide information about the impact of a product on the environment and human health when the product is misused or disposed of in addition to the name and concentration of hazardous, the name of parts that contain hazardous substances, and whether a part or product can be recycled.

Under previous proposals, products listed in the Key Administrative Catalogue for the Pollution Control of EIPs, would need to be tested by one of the approved labs in China and obtain CCC accreditation (China RoHS Certification).

Under the new China RoHS proposals the Catalogue will be renamed as the Target Administrative Catalogue for the Pollution Control of Electrical and Electronic Products. Various government bodies will set a timeline to prohibit the use of certain hazardous chemicals for the products listed in the Catalogue.

The MIIT will receive more authority to coordinate the implementation of China RoHS issues. The MIIT and the Certification and Accreditation Administration of China will establish a “product compliance assessment system”.

So, almost three years on from the last set of significant proposals are we finally seeing some progress? However, there is still no indication of a date where product restrictions will enter into force.

China RoHS “Phase 2″ running almost five years late!

Directive Decoder

 

 

Related posts