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MIT OLED Display Blocks give 360-degree perspective

mit-media-lab-oled-display-blocks-1.jpgData visualization, manipulation and exploration, in the palm of your hand…

We like to keep an eye on the cutting-edge work at MIT, and how about this from the MIT Media Labs? The OLED cubes are designed to give a 360-degree perspective on data or events.

The intriguing work is being done in the Fluid Interfaces Group, to be precise, and involves six 1.25-inch panels (18 x 128 pixels) sitting in plastic cubes, which are dubbed Display Blocks.

The work is being done in the Fluid Interfaces Group, to be precise, and involves six 1.25-inch panels (18 x 128 pixels) sitting in plastic cubes, which are dubbed Display Blocks.

MIT describes the work:

Display Blocks is a novel approach to display technology, which consists of arranging six organic light emitting diode screens in a cubic form factor. The aim of the project is to explore the possibilities that this type of display holds for data visualization, manipulation and exploration. The research focuses on exploring how the physicality of the screen can be leveraged to better interpret its contents. To this end, the physical design is accompanied by a series of applications that demonstrate the advantages of this technology.

Engadget.com reports on the work, speaking to Research Assistant Pol Pla i Conesa, who envisaged a number of possible scenarios for his Display Blocks:

Take, for example, the 2004 film Crash, which tells interweaving stories that could be presented simultaneously with such a display – simply rotate the cube until you land on a narrative you’d like to follow, and the soundtrack will adjust to match.

It could also go a long way when it comes to visualizing data, especially when in groups – instead of virtually constructing profiles of individuals who applied for a slot at MIT, for example, or segments of a business that need to be organized based on different parameters, you could have each assigned to a cube, which can be tossed into an accepted or rejected pile, and repositioned as necessary.

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