Latest Electronic Gadget News: Test and Measurement

How to build your own Geiger Counter

Here’s a very interesting project, with a very worthy motive behind it, reports Technabob. Some engineers at Libelium, a wireless sensor network company, decided to help the people of Japan, around Fukushima, determine levels of radiation for themselves. The result was an Arduino-based device that would detect Alpha…

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Dangerous laser pointer? Find out at home

Poorly-made green laser pointers can damage your eyesight, and mighty US tech lab NIST has devised a home table top experiment to help separate the dangerous from good. Very much in the Blue Peter mould, it requires two plastic cups, a CD, and a webcam…

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iPhone app reads your PicoScope

Testing is a crucial part of the development cycle, as any gadget master will have suffered, and here’s a cool iPhone app to help the process, when you find yourself turning to use a PicoScope…

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Video: MCU turns the gears of time

Check out this inventive use of an MCU and stepper motor by one Alan Parekh. This great looking gear clock tells the time in a unique way. A PIC 16F628A microcontroller with an external 20MHz crystal oscillator times a stepper gear, which drives a minute display, which also drives an…

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Richard had a flash of inspiration

Now he’s got the power to cut lightning down to size People have always been fascinated by the fury of the heavens. Electronics prodigy Richard Hodgkinson created a lightning distance timer so he would no longer have to manually calculate the approach or retreat of a thunderstorm. He recycled…

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Keep your PC cool this winter

Return to Taking the Temperature An accurate PC thermometer you need all year round Award-winning designer Alberto Ricci Bitti designed this simple microcontroller-free DS1621 PC thermometer that requires no calibration. It’s so cheap and simple because all you need is the sensor IC, a voltage regulator and…

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Meet Andrew's blast from the past

Back to the future Sometimes the best way to take a step forward is to take a step back in time. So Andrew Smith designed a fully-functional toy oscilloscope, made out of parts he found in his junk box, such as the EF91, EF80 and EF184 valves. Using a…

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