mannerisms

Ruminations on the electronics industry from David Manners, Senior Components Editor on Electronics Weekly.

Is Bing As Good As Google?

Could another search engine catch on? One assumes it would have to be significantly better than Google if it is to do so, and so the question one has to ask is: Is Bing much better than Google?

 

Analysts comScore say Microsoft (boosted by Bing) achieved a 2% rise in to 11% in its share of the US search market in early June, compared to Google’s 60% and Yahoo’s 20%.

 

Now  the Bing Boost could be influenced by the fact that Microsoft is said to be spending $100 million on promoting Bing. People could be simply trying Bing out.

 

Bing’s lay-out looks bland and stodgy but it gets the usual stuff up you’d expect in a Google search.

And it adopts the Google format of paid ads down the right hand side.

To all intents and purposes it’s a Google clone.

 

When I tried some unusual stuff like searching on ‘skew whiff’, Bing didn’t have the nous to recognise this as ‘skew-whiff’, though once I had put in the hyphen, it came up with much the same results as Google.

On the other hand it picked up my Villefranche hotel where I’m spending a couple of nights next week as quickly as Google does.

 

I don’t think Bing’s any worse than Google, but if you’re a new rival to an incumbent you have to be better, some people would say much better,  if you’re to displace the incumbent.

Bing isn’t and I don’t think it will.

Tags: google, google search, incumbent, search engine, usual stuff

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6 Comments

  1. David Manners
    September 21, 2009 15:25

    Very interesting, Jessica, thanks – so much of what Microsoft does these days is third rate.

  2. September 21, 2009 15:12

    Bing is currently dropping sites and pages like theres no tomorrow (just like MSN always has done)i’ve noticed this with several sites.. they do come back though in the majority of cases.
    Bing is a joke.. the all new search engine, yet behaves exactly the same as MSN and returns the same results.

  3. Peter Smith
    June 26, 2009 17:41

    I despair of everyone cloning the most popular. I used to favour Ask, as it not only responded better to questions than Google, it also gave results from other search engines. Now, it’s just another Google clone.
    Didn’t I hear, some time back, someone had come up with an alternative to the “crawler” search engines? Do you know what happened to it?

  4. Outsider
    June 23, 2009 15:14

    Here is an idea…
    Google does not have to change, because there are a lot of Google fans, I suppose if the Bing phenomenon catches on, Google can always copy the interface and branch off as GoogleLite. This can be called ‘GoogleLight’ or ‘GoogleLeet’ (a portmanteau between google and elite).
    You can then choose between Google Classic or the new GoogleLite. What do you think? ;-)

  5. David Manners
    June 17, 2009 12:26

    Cheese, I don’t think Microsoft dare do it especially with the current change in the regulatory zeitgeist

  6. Cheese
    June 17, 2009 08:18

    I tried bing too, and with an open mind. Clearly it is leagues ahead of previous attempts from microsoft. In some cases, it can beat Google. For example, binging for mobile phones yields better results than googling for it.
    Come to think of it, Bing or no Bing, Google needs to rethink their search engine strategy and presentation. Google search, their only milking cow, has not changed ever. The Google UI is becoming a bit boring and so are the search results headed by the biased sponsored links, followed by the obligatory wikipedia link, and then the really useful ones…
    But changing Google search will upset the adsense cashcow while inviting criticism from the masses that love the status quo. So Google is facing the incumbent dilemma. Change – and the world hates you. Dont change, and the world hates you. Worse, a newbie can be the change, and with no baggage to carry, can spark the same enthusiasm that made Google what it now is. Is bing likely to do that? Will microsoft build in bing into their OS? Sounds far-fetched, but can be a clever strategy (EU legalities notwithstanding).

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