mannerisms

Stories from electronics industry

The Altruistic Gambler

When WWII broke out, Tom Watson Senior offered IBM’s factories to the US government to make armaments…

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Too Many Cooks

There have been scores of reasons given for Nokia’s demise – a refusal to utilise its own inventions like touchscreens, ignoring its engineers’ recommendations, the ‘warring tribes’ syndrome caused by over-segmentation, neglecting innovation, miss-reading the shift to mobile computing and social networking, recruiting a raft of non-technical…

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The Superiority Of Semiconductors

Dr Wolfgang Ziebart, former CEO of Infineon, always thought of the IC business as superior to other parts of  the electronics industry…

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The UK Science/Technology Dilemma

David Potter, who founded Psion which became a FTSE 100 company while he was CEO, has a good take on the UK’s attitude to the relationship between science and technology…

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The Hungry Customer

“When I was CEO of Intel, I had an unusual experience while visiting a customer,” recounts Andy Grove, “it was during a period of tight availability of microprocessors, our main product. This was not an unusual state of affairs. Supply and demand ebbed and flowed as the computer business had…

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Invention

Ted Hoff, inventor of the microprocessor, joined Intel the year it was formed.

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The CEO Who Believed In Freedom

The man who made Nokia great, Jorma Ollila, liked rousting people around. “You have to innovate all the time, renew yourself all the time,” he said. Execs were switched around constantly. he said he’d move himself around if he could…

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The Technologist Whose Market Grew Too Fast

Hal Philipp, founder and CEO of  charge transfer capacitive sensing specialist Quantum Research, sold his business to Atmel for $88 million.   “I’m more of a technologist”, said Philipp in 2008, the year he sold QR to Atmel,, “I like the technology side. The business side has become almost…

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Putting Jobs Where People Are.

The investments made by STMicroelectronics in Catania, which have become news-worthy in the last six months with Micron Technology trying to displace researchers located there, were prompted 60 years ago by social conditions in Italy…

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The CEO Who Sang

A long time ago, in a simpler age before the ubiquity of mass media, people used to sing more. They sang in their homes, they sang after dinner, they sang in the pubs and they sang as they went to war…

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When Blair Was Right

Tony Blair was wrong about almost everything – wars, the Euro, super-casinos, 24 hour opening etc etc but one thing he got right…

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