Android smartphone is not mobile but fixed

HFC CannaHFC Canna is that rare thing, an Android-based smart telephone (not a mobile).

Its creators are looking for funding in the Kickstarter crowd-funding website.

Like a mobile it has a 7 or 10 inch touchscreen, but it can either be a standard PSTN wireline phone or VoIP internet phone.

The Android platform running on a 1.8GHz quad-core CPU brings features such as digital answering machine, a digital photo frame, optional DECT 6.0 handsets, calendar, e-notifications and web browser to the phone.

The phone can be synchronised with your cell phone and Gmail contacts.

The phone can also integrate number of digital cameras to provide video surveillance around your house or around your business.

It provides VoIP capabilities as well. HFC offers its own SIP client with both voice and video functions. It runs a variety of OTT communication clients, such as Skype, Line, QQ, and others.

There are two form-factors with a 7 inch or 10 inch screen. There are three processing options 1.2GHz CPU, quad-core 1.8GHz CPU and quad-core 1.8GHz CPU with DECT 6.0.

 

 

Tags: digital cameras

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2 Comments

  1. Tinye420
    February 07, 2014 14:30

    Thats all we need…a phone with a camera at your desk…so the boss can check on you any time…so random hackers/burglers can get in, take a look around, determine no one is there and then come in and rob you…what about government office…secret places…imagine one of these phones sitting on a desk in the white house…someone hacks in, watches and listens to all of the private conversations of our government officials…ok, so yes this is all “crazy” consiracy stuff…and I guess technically it could be done to the cell phones everyone carries around…but I think these are some legit points.

  2. February 07, 2014 16:32

    Legitimate points indeed, Tinye420. Speaking, however, as someone who has to deal with an awful office telephone system, my main concern would be general usability.

    How easy is it to transfer calls, and process voice messsages? Rather than questions of surveillance.

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