Electronics Research News

Tiny thumb trackpad is wireless

For wireless control when hands are full, MIT has invented a thumbnail trackpad called NailO. Stroking it in different directions transmits mouse-like commands to PCs and phones. Even though it sticks on like an artificial nail, packed into the prototype are capacitive sensors, a battery, a microcontroller, and chips…

Read More

Double walled carbon nanotubes allow bandgap tuning

Mathematicians at Rice University in Texas have delved into the possible behaviour of double-walled carbon nanotubes and found a potential bandgap. Carbon nanotubes are not one thing. Instead, characteristics including tube diameter and the amount of twist in the atomic lattice along the tubular molecule are variables. One simple…

Read More

Sensor tells you if meat has gone off

MIT chemists have devised a simple sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat. Consisting of carbon nanotubes, the sensor is similar to other nanotube devices that have been developed in the lab of chemistry professor Timothy Swager, including one that detects the ripeness of fruit. The carbon nanotubes…

Read More

Printed circuits can stretch the wearable boundaries

Electronic circuit boards that are stretchable may soon be used in robots and wearable smart clothing, say researchers at a US-based university. The aim of research at Purdue University is to inkjet-print liquid-metal alloys to create a new type of flexible electronic circuit. Elastic technologies could make…

Read More
Read More

Nimble liquid crystal makes fast organic FETs

Using a smectic liquid crystal material, researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have built a polycrystalline organic FET with mobility around 12cm2/Vs. The bottom gate transistors are consistent, exhibiting device-to-device variation of 1.2cm2/Vs across a substrate. “Considering that it could potentially be necessary to fabricate…

Read More

Significant step for artificial intelligence

Artificial neural networks can learn more than one task if neurons are encouraged to clump, and clumps are encouraged to specialise, according to research at the University of Wyoming. The discovery may be related to the formation of animal brains, which have specialised regions. A combination of learning and evolution…

Read More

Updated: Aluminium ion battery hits thousands of cycles for grid storage

Stanford University has produced an aluminium ion cell with “no decay over hundreds of cycles, even thousands of cycles”, according to scientist Ming Gong, yet it can be charged in a minute. Key to long life, according to a paper in Nature (‘An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery’), is using…

Read More