Latest Electronics Research News

Nature inspires CMOS colour sensor

An aluminium surface grating can add colour selectivity to CMOS chips, without separate colour filters, claims a team of US researchers. The grating works by surface plasmon – where photons interact with a wave of electrons. Colour selection, and focussing, comes from interference between the plasmonic grating and the photodetector’s…

Read More

Old tyres become batteries

Old tyres could be a source of anode carbon for lithium-ion cells, said Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the US. When used in lab cells, after 100 cycles capacity was nearly 390mAh/g “which exceeds the best properties of commercial graphite”, claimed ORNL, attributing this to the micro-structure…

Read More

How Harvard's 1,024 robot swarm does what it does

Researchers at Harvard University’s school of engineering have been puzzling over autonomous robot collaboration – in particular, how do you get robots that can only sense a short distance to make something big without an all-seeing eye or central control to direct them. And recently they have had some…

Read More
Read More

OpenStax digital textbooks learn as you learn

Tired of learning from a dusty old textbook? Try a book that learns from you. Students in Houston, Texas, are about to get their hands on the first digital schoolbooks that use artificial intelligence to personalise lessons…

Read More

UK to study cosmic ray chip damage

UK scientists have built a facility to understand how particles from space interact with today’s shrinking electronic devices. Called ChipIR, is now part of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) ISIS neutron source at Harwell in Oxfordshire, and will mimic cosmic ray neutrons which can cause soft errors…

Read More

Stick-on lactate-sensing tattoo becomes bio-battery

US researchers have fabricated sweat-powered batteries, based on lactate-sensing temporary tattoos – skin ‘transfers’ – the team revealed last year. The battery is bendable and stretchable. With side-by-side electrodes covering 2x3mm of skin, the batteries can generates 4µW (70µW/cm2) once the person exercises enough to…

Read More

Graphene turns rubber bands into durable sensors

Normal rubber bands can be turned into strain sensors by infusing them with graphene flakes, according to researchers at the University of Surrey and Trinity College Dublin. The process is predictable, reliable and repeatable, costs only a few pence, and the resulting sensors are durable and comparable in performance with…

Read More