Electronics Research News

Polysilicon-on-paper for printing low-cost circuits

Polysilicon can be made on paper and other low-temperature substrates by a process developer by researchers in The Netherlands and Japan. The same process has yielded CMOS transistors on a wafer. Silicon has already been used as an alternative to organic and oxide semiconductor materials in inks for printing…

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Proto-quantum computer addresses Boson sampling

Quantum computers should theoretically outpace ordinary ones, but attempts to build a speedy quantum machine have so far come up short. Now an approach based on a Victorian counting device seems to be getting close. This proto-quantum computer can only solve one problem. But that problem, called boson sampling…

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Microphone harvests acoustic energy to top up its charge

Researchers in America have developed a postage stamp-sized microphone that can harvest acoustic energy to top up your charge on the go. Zhong Wang of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and his colleagues created their microphone from a thin sheet of paper just a few centimetres across…

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Tiny thumb trackpad is wireless

For wireless control when hands are full, MIT has invented a thumbnail trackpad called NailO. Stroking it in different directions transmits mouse-like commands to PCs and phones. Even though it sticks on like an artificial nail, packed into the prototype are capacitive sensors, a battery, a microcontroller, and chips…

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Double walled carbon nanotubes allow bandgap tuning

Mathematicians at Rice University in Texas have delved into the possible behaviour of double-walled carbon nanotubes and found a potential bandgap. Carbon nanotubes are not one thing. Instead, characteristics including tube diameter and the amount of twist in the atomic lattice along the tubular molecule are variables. One simple…

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Sensor tells you if meat has gone off

MIT chemists have devised a simple sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat. Consisting of carbon nanotubes, the sensor is similar to other nanotube devices that have been developed in the lab of chemistry professor Timothy Swager, including one that detects the ripeness of fruit. The carbon nanotubes…

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Printed circuits can stretch the wearable boundaries

Electronic circuit boards that are stretchable may soon be used in robots and wearable smart clothing, say researchers at a US-based university. The aim of research at Purdue University is to inkjet-print liquid-metal alloys to create a new type of flexible electronic circuit. Elastic technologies could make…

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