Latest Electronics Research News

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ISSCC: ARM puts digital scope on a chip

UK processor firm ARM has built a digital storage oscilloscope on a chip, and a programmable load, to investigate voltage rail behaviour amongst multiple processor cores. The transients are nanoseconds in duration, millivolts in height, and when they occur is dependent on the instantaneous interaction of application software, operating system…

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Imec gets closer to directed self-assembly

Imec, Tokyo Electron and Merck have developed a directed self-assembly (DSA) process for a via patterning process compatible with the 7nm technology node and have significantly improved DSA defectivity to 24 defects/cm2…

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Imperial researchers target printable graphene

Health sensors could one day be 3D-printed in graphene according to researchers at Imperial College, London. The team at Imperial has developed a method for printing miniature components from graphene, using a new graphene paste. Graphene is the new light and flexible semiconductor material first identified at the University…

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UK firms invest in sodium-ion batteries

British battery start-up Faradion has almost £2m with which to develop sodium-ion batteries following further funding by existing investors Finance Yorkshire, Rising Stars Growth Fund and Haldor Topsoe. “A Japanese electronics giant”, said Faradion, earlier also provided funding. Sodium is far cheaper than lithium, and the firm claims…

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Telescopic contact lenses zoom into focus

Telescopic contact lenses that let the wearer switch between normal and magnified vision are coming into focus, reports New Scientist. The latest prototype – unveiled last week at the AAAS Annual Meeting in San Jose, California – could one day help people with visual impairment. The lenses might be particularly useful for…

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Advanced demodulation boosts fibre range

Using an advanced de-modulation technique, researchers at University College in London have almost doubled the distance data can be transmitted through fibre from 3,190km to 5,890km without repeaters. New York to London is 5,600km as the crow flies. All work was done at the receive end…

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