The Death Of Traditional TV

Ten years ago Intel’s Sean Maloney made a particularly prescient prediction – that traditional TV would die.

Ten years ago Intel’s Sean Maloney made a particularly prescient prediction – that traditional TV would die.

Maloney told the Telegraph  that traditional TV was doomed because user-generated content, distributed over the Internet, was going to be of higher quality than professional content. The reason for that is a new generation of consumer ICs delivering HD quality video.

“That is a profound change,” said Maloney, “user-generated content is going to become higher quality than professional content. Professional providers may sneer and say it’s not what it looks like, it’s the quality of the content, but that would be to ignore the lessons of the past few years and the emergence of the likes of YouTube.

“Over the next two years you are going to have an explosion in high quality video broadcast on the internet. The same thing that happened to print media in the 1990s with the move to the web will happen with broadcast media.

“People no longer have the patience to sit in their chairs in front of the TV and wait for it to happen. That whole way of life is going to change and it will completely unravel the traditional television model. The era of TV is drawing to an end.”

With traditional TV networks dragging their heels over HD transmissions, the availability of user-generated HD-quality video will mean, argued Maloney, that people will prefer to watch user-generated content, a la YouTube, than traditional TV programmes.

Maloney’s view was shared by Ben Elton in his 2007 novel Blind Faith. In Elton’s novel, set in the future, people only watch reality TV. The idea of drama, based on fictional characters, is dismissed as a regrettable, and laughable, weakness of past civilisations.

Unfortunately, due to Elton’s gloomy view of human nature, in his book, the vast majority of this user-generated content revolves around rumpy-pumpy.

 


Comments

10 comments

  1. Spot on Robetc, there’s still that frisson of naughtiness when the lights go down

  2. How prophetic was the title of an old TV series

    Never Mind the Quality, Feel the Width

  3. Very true Pete, I wonder why. Maybe cinema is still used for dating

    • You are about right there David. Even for us wrinkly old romantics a night out with amazing sound and a screen bigger than the back garden is still a great treat. A meal to follow and a taxi home. Perfect.

  4. Cinema is thriving.

  5. “The reason for that is a new generation of consumer ICs delivering HD quality video.”

    Deary me. Trust an IC marketer to say that. Giving an infinite number of monkeys solid gold typewriters
    instead of steel ones isn’t going to stop them spending most of their time making incoherent noises and
    flinging their s**t at each other…

    TB

  6. “Unfortunately, due to Elton’s gloomy view of human nature, in his book, the vast majority of this user-generated content revolves around rumpy-pumpy.”

    True, but;

    Don’t forget the kittens.

  7. What is the point of HD TV (broadcast or internet) if the content is crap?

    • SecretEuroPatentAgentMan

      HDTV is the craft of polishing the poo, elevated to an art.

      Meanwhile YouTube grows explosively in contents and viewership.

  8. Just before replying I watched the latest Techmoan video (which was coincidentally on Pocket TVs) on Youtube.

    There is far more interesting stuff on Youtube than on TV. Techmoan is like a looking backwards Tomorrows World (although all the Koreans were quick to point out that they still have a DVB-H type system).

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