Conference programme

Conference programmeRichard Ball
Next week’s Embedded Systems Show features nine different technical seminars, each focusing on a different aspect of the embedded world. Seminars are free, but attendees must register in advance. The conference organiser, EDA Exhibitions, can be contacted on 0171 681 1000, or www.eda-expos.co.uk Programme Schedule Wednesday
10:00
11:30
13:00
14:00
15:45 Room A
Asic
IP Core

8-bit
DSP Room B
Network
Code
RTOS
IDE
Debug Thursday
10:00
11:30
13:00
14:00
15:45 Room A
8-bit
DSP

Asic
IP Core Room B
IDE
Debug
RTOS
Network
Code
  Asic/FPGA design and integration for embedded systems
The theme for this session is very much along the lines of systems level development and will feature presentations from LSI Logic, Mentor Graphics and QuickLogic. The topics will include: deciding which functions to implement on and off chip; handling timing to/from custom and reprogrammable devices in an embedded system; and developing the optimal tool flow strategy. The fourth presentation will be given by a representative of the DTI who will outline an initiative to help UK companies involved in electronics design adopt a more systematic approach to product development. DSP in communications – the next five years
Digital signal processing is key to much of what we take for granted today. It is now being implemented in more diverse areas but has always been prolific in communications. Semiconductor companies are also investing vast amounts of money in developing the next generation of signal processing hardware to build these communication infrastructures upon, such as the third generation mobile ‘phone. Papers from Texas Instruments, Infineon Technologies (Siemens), Motorola and Cambridge Control (Mathworks) cover the technologies that will power the telecoms age for the next five years. IP core integration for embedded systems design
Intellectual property (IP) and the shift to block-based design is being touted as the only viable future for designing ICs in consumer, computer and communications products. Indeed, it is seen as the only way in which designers of multi-million gate Asics can meet ever tightening time-to-market pressures. Papers from ARM, Cadence Design Systems, Mentor Graphics and Phoenix Technologies will look at several aspects of this emerging sector of the industry. Topics covered include the challenge of integrating complex cores, bus architectures and methods of sourcing IP cores. 8-bit microcontrollers: Novel applications for the latest architectures
CAN-bus applications in the automotive sector and farther afield, integrated serial port communications and a low cost micro with a processing performance of 100Mips are amongst the topics being covered in the session on that low cost and ubiquitous workhorse of the microcontroller community, the 8-bit MCU. Leading suppliers Motorola, STMicroelectronics, Arizona Microchip and Scenix Semiconductor will map out the latest offerings in program memory and communications ports, as well as some surprisingly high processing performances which ensure the continuing application of 8-bit microcontrollers. Implementing and debugging real time systems
While it is possible to design a custom Real-Time system using simple tools, the resulting code is often specific to the application and can be very difficult to update without bringing the whole house of cards crashing down. There can be no substitute in this area for the “right tools for the job”. The selected papers in this session, from Motorola, Mentor Graphics, Applied Microsystems and Hitex, will extend your knowledge of the tools and techniques and allow you to make an informed decision on future projects. Real time predictability: What you need from an RTOS
Although for some years we have had so-called schedulability analysis, there’s been little progress in building RTOSs to meet the demands of the analysis. The analysis is able to calculate the worst-case response times of all activities in a system (both tasks and interrupt handlers) but relies on the underlying RTOS scheduler to meet certain assumptions. We will go through the basic mathematics, called Deadline Monotonic Analysis (DMA), in detail and then show the requirements DMA places on the RTOS support. The talk concludes with an appraisal of the current state of RTOS design. Networked embedded systems
As the trend continues to link systems to each other and to the rest of the world in general. Some important new lessons have to be learnt. There are questions of performance, security and user acceptability to consider in any design. The papers in this session will discuss the questions of networking, from LANs to the WWW, and will uncover some new ideas and concepts for application engineers, be they ‘hard’ or ‘soft’. Offering insights will be Integrated Systems Inc., ARM, Wind River Systems, and Nohau. Software development issues – creating reliable code
Software Design is no longer a static subject. New techniques and languages are now available to the software engineer and they are not to be ignored. The use of Java and EC++ in embedded systems is intended to provide better and more secure code. Many will want to stick with their trusted C. Producing safe, reliable C code can be as much an art as a science. The arrival of new languages and techniques might take some of the guesswork out of the design process. CAD-UL, Green Hills Software, Real Time Products and Diab Data will give papers. System development tools – the evolving IDE
Using the right development tool is essential in modern system development. There are many new aspects to products that need to be supported. An embedded RTOS may need to be simulated, alongside complicated hardware operations. The design process in today’s large memory systems needs to be supported as much as the coding and debugging. The introduction of a GUI into new applications needs support to minimise the time to market. In this session the papers from Synopsys, Summit Design, SDS, Artisan Software Tools and Wind River Systems present users with a view of modern features available in modern integrated development environments.


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