NEC and VideoLogic provide Sega engine

NEC and VideoLogic provide Sega engine
Richard Ball Games console developer Sega has confirmed that NEC Electronics and VideoLogic are providing the 3D graphics engine for its next product. VideoLogic, based in Hertfordshire, has created a custom chip around its PowerVR architecture. Early parts, made by NEC, have already been supplied to Sega. “I believe Sega has been giving out systems to ISVs [independent software vendors] already,” said Hossein Yassaie, vice-president of R&D at VideoLogic Sales volumes for the new Sega console, called Dreamcast, are difficult to estimate, said Yassaie: “It’s not just for games. It has a network interface and has Windows CE – it’s a cross between a network PC and a games console.” Dreamcast could also be used for Web browsing, Internet access and networked gaming. Sega’s last console sold some 50 million units. “We expect Dreamcast to be significantly better than that,” said Yassaie. The second generation PowerVR architecture from VideoLogic has some major improvements over the first. Performance is doubled, letting PowerVR process three million polygon/s in the Sega version. The company has worked with Microsoft to make PowerVR compatible with the Direct3D application programming interface. This will make it easier for software writers to develop games for different platforms. VideoLogic hopes for design wins in PC graphics cards and arcade games as well as the games consoles such as Sega. Last year a legal row developed between 3Dfx, Sega, NEC and VideoLogic. 3Dfx claims unfair business practices led to Sega dropping the company in favour of the NEC-VideoLogic partnership. 3Dfx is seeking more than $100m in damages.


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