Sun continues Java push with Cadence

Sun continues Java push with Cadence
Richard Ball Sun Microsystems has announced an alliance with Cadence to provide a design service for Java powered Internet devices. This is the second move in as many weeks by Sun to promote Java. Last week, it announced free licensing of the picoJava and Sparc processor architectures. Despite a prolonged campaign to promote Java, it has yet to make a major impact on the embedded market. Peter Harverson, general manager of Sun Microelectronics in Europe, thinks Java’s time is nigh: “In Europe, there’s a lot of companies that want some kind of Internet functionality.” Discussions between these companies and Sun have foundered, Harverson said, because neither Sun nor the interested company have spare design facilities. Cadence, meanwhile, has spent several years building its successful ‘design factory’, of which the Alba Centre in Scotland is a notable example. Nearly 2,000 system-on-a-chip designers are due to be employed at Alba by 2002. “They’ve got the bits of the puzzle that we don’t have – the design people and other blocks of intellectual property,” Harverson said. For now at least, the arrangement between the firms is an exclusive one. Typical applications that could use the Java hardware and operating system include hand-held PCs, smartcards, Web TVs and network computers.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*