Testing difficulties open door to Rambus options

Testing difficulties open door to Rambus options
David Manners Rambus memory is difficult to test, say test equipment manufacturers, re-opening the door to other technologies. “A lot of the automatic test equipment on the market today cannot meet the Rambus spec. People say they can test Rambus but maybe they won’t be able to do it,” said Ruedi Egger of IMS. Gerhard Kessler, senior managing director of Advantest, added: “Many semiconductor companies are shifting to PC133. Rambus was dominant but my guess is that other technologies may get some advantage now.” The problems of testing Rambus were highlighted in a panel discussion at last week’s Semicon Europa. “I believe that by 2002 the majority of DRAMs will be Rambus DRAMs but the challenges to make that happen fast are horrendous. One problem is that you can’t test 64 Rambus DRAMs in parallel, you can only do 8,” said Pascal Rond?, general manager of Hewlett-Packard’s European semiconductor test operation. Manufacturers need either more testers or to look at the test strategy and divide time between Rambus and synchronous DRAM testers. “The frequencies are testing the laws of physics involving such small timeframes that any noise, or any impedance mismatch leads to a degradation in test performance,” said Gordon Borneman of Teradyne.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*