Wearable Web server fits in pocket

Wearable Web server fits in pocket
Tom Foremski A Stanford University professor has created a tiny Web server that fits into a shirt pocket. The device is one of the smallest PC computer devices ever built and is part of Stanford’s research focus into wearable computer systems that promises to be a lucrative market for electronics firms. Using standard components, Vaughan Pratt, Professor of Computer Science at Stanford, built a Web server less than 4.5cm high, 7cm wide and 0.7cm thick. It consists of an Advanced Micro Devices 486-SX 66MHz microprocessor, 16Mbyte of DRAM and 16Mbyte of flash ROM. It is connected to the Internet through a parallel port and runs a version of the Linux operating system. “It’s basically a powerful little computer,” said Pratt. “We could have set it up for a number of different uses. But, because most people think of servers as mysterious boxes, located in dark basements and cranking out stuff for everyone to see, I thought making it into a Web server was particularly dramatic.” The tiny server is one of the first projects of the Wearables Lab that Pratt has started. The lab is modelled on that of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Both labs are developing computer technology that can be fitted directly into clothing.


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